WASPS LOSE OUT AGAIN

London Wasps faced yet another defeat in the Aviva Premiership as the Chiefs thrashed the London Wasps 15 to 12 at Adam’s Park.

It was Ignacio Mieres who took five very crucial penalties for the Chiefs that put the Wasps in a tight spot.

The Chiefs kept their defence line intact and safe despite tremendous pressure from the Wasps over long periods of time. The Wasps in response took one less penalty than the Chiefs that made all the difference in this match.

These penalties were taken by Nick Robinson who converted the penalties successfully to keep his team in the game.
London Wasps came into this game with a big loss record and hence were very desperate for a win here at Adam’s park.

They have been afflicted with a poor form and are now fighting to keep away from the relegation zone along with Newcastle. On the other hand the Chiefs are now contending for a much coveted place in the Heineken Cup.

It was Wasps who drew first blood after Robinson converted a penalty after the Chiefs were pinged for offside. Wasps started the game well and dominated the possession in the early stages of the match. But some wild off-loads on their part prevented them from taking a good lead in the match.

The Chiefs then equalised with the Wasps after Mieres converted a penalty. He then put the visitors up front after converting another good penalty. Wasps came very close to drawing level with the Chiefs as Daly’s penalty from a long range dropped just wide. The match conditions then started to worsen and handling the ball became a huge problem by both sides.

The Chiefs still made the most of the situations after Mieres converted a third penalty which gave the visitors a much deserved 6 points lead over the Hosts at half time. This lead was then extended to nine points as Mieres again converted a penalty, making no mistakes for the 4th time in the match.

Chiefs then converted one more penalty while Wasps converted three more. This still wasn’t enough as Chiefs won the match with the score standing at 15 to 12 at full time.